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1. Annual tax return declaration
The offer includes:
- Preparing and submitting of the annual balance sheets,
- Registering the purchase of real estate
- Paying the annual state taxes and any other municipality fees
- Providing information about state, municipality and other fees and taxes
2. Registration of a company
. The offer includes:
- State fees
- Court fees
- Notary and translation fees
- Depositing the share capital (if needed)

Business in Bulgaria

Business travel and Visas

Entry Visas

If you are from an EU member state, the UK, Canada, USA or Israel you do not need a visa to enter the country. Those from EU countries may stay in the country for up to 90 days in a six-month period, counting from the first date of entry. For citizens of the US, Canada, the UK and Israel this period is up to 30 days within a six-month period, counting from the first date of entry. It doesn’t matter whether you leave and re-enter the country within that period, as the total number of days is what matters.

Travelers who are not citizens of the US or the countries listed above should obtain an entry visa in advance from the Bulgarian Embassy or Consulate in their country. For this they will need to provide a letter of invitation from a Bulgarian host, on a standard form, provided by the municipality, or a business partner, as well as a letter from their company or institution if they are traveling on business. Applicants for visas should note that incomplete forms, absence of photographs or inadequate payment usually result in the return of the application to the applicant without further action, and that turnover in the embassies is quite slow.

Staying On

For those wishing to stay longer than the permitted period the situation is difficult, even if their reasons for being here are quite genuine. In order to obtain a residence permit (1 or 5 years) one should either own a company which employs at least 10 Bulgarian staff and/or invest at least $500,000 in the country. Oh yes, and to get a 5 year residence permit you will soon have to sit a test in Bulgarian language proficiency!

You can get more information by visiting the Passport Office for Foreigners at 48 Maria Luiza Blvd. in Sofia, where the treatment is less than friendly and the waiting long, but these are really the only people who can give you a straight story.

Transit Visas

Transit visas allow a stay in Bulgaria of 24 hours or less. Airline tickets and evidence of right of entry into the next country of travel will be required. Possession of airline tickets does not guarantee the granting of an entry visa.

Medical Insurance

Although citizens of the countries listed above do not require visas for stays of up to a certain period, depending on their countries, they should be able, on request, to show evidence of medical insurance valid for Bulgaria.
The travel/medical insurance should be for at least $5000 and should cover emergency medical expenses, repatriation, transport of mortal remains, funeral and hospitalisation.
If the visitor has insurance of this type, a copy of the policy, with legible policy number, company name, duration of validity and sum of coverage or a letter from the insurance company including these data, should be submitted with the visa application.
If the traveller does not have such insurance, a visa application can be made without it, but the insurance must be obtained after the consulate has informed the applicant that the visa is approved. The visa will be issued only after proof of insurance is submitted.

General Information

Bulgaria has liberalized its visa policy as a gesture of reciprocity and to conform to international standards. A valid passport is all that is required for visitors from the EU and European Free Trade Association (EFTA) member states for stays up to 30 days. In addition, the citizens of Cuba, Croatia, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, the Republic of Korea, Lithuania, Macedonia, Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Serbia and Montenegro, Tunisia, Turkey and Switzerland may enter the country without a visa for a period of 30 days with a normal valid passport.

A visa is also no longer required of visitors from the US, Israel, Japan, Cyprus, Hong Kong, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, for stays of up to 30 days.

A border tax of about $20 will be collected from such individuals on entering the country. If the planned stay is to be more than 30 days, or if traveling on a diplomatic or official passport, a visa is required and must be obtained in advance.

US citizens with regular passports intending to stay more than 30 days can get them free of charge under a reciprocal US-Bulgaria agreement, but a $20 processing fee is collected per passport.
Travelers who have a one-year multiple entry visa for Bulgaria may stay up to 90 days altogether within six months. If a traveler comes to Bulgaria, stays in the country for 90 days and then leaves, he or she will not be able to enter the country within the next 90 days.

Although citizens of the countries listed above do not require visas for stays of up to 30 days, they should be able, on request, to show evidence of medical insurance valid for Bulgaria.
The travel/medical insurance should be for at least $5000 and should cover emergency medical expenses, repatriation, transport of mortal remains, funeral and hospitalization.
If the visitor has insurance of this type, a copy of the policy, with legible policy number, company name, duration of validity and sum of coverage or a letter from the insurance company including these data, should be submitted with the visa application.

If the traveler does not have such insurance, a visa application can be made without it, but the insurance must be obtained after the consulate has informed the applicant that the visa is approved. The visa will be issued only after proof of insurance is submitted.

Travelers who are not citizens of the US or the countries listed above are expected to provide a letter of invitation from a Bulgarian host, on a standard form, provided by the municipality, or a business partner, as well as a letter from their company or institution if they are traveling on business.

Transit visas allow a stay in Bulgaria of 24 hours or less. Airline tickets and evidence of right of entry into the next country of travel will be required.

Possession of airline tickets does not guarantee the granting of an entry visa.

Applicants for visas should note that incomplete forms, absence of photographs or inadequate payment usually result in the return of the application to the applicant without further action.
Those traveling with pets should have a certificate of veterinarian examination, carried out within a week before departure, as well as a certificate of rabies shots done during the past six months.

Motor vehicle insurance can be arranged at the Bulgarian border point of entry. For motorists an international driving license is required.

Travelers with children with them should note that Bulgaria is party to steps against international child abduction. These usually include requiring documentary evidence of parental relationship and permission for the child's travel from the parent(s) or legal guardian not present. Having such documentation on hand may help to avoid complications.
Bulgaria introduced new-style visas in 2002, with extra security features including the integration of a color photograph. The new-style visa is an electronic type linked to the database of the central system for visa control of foreigners.

The visa is of a similar type to be introduced by European Union states between 2003 and 2007.

It is rare now, but upon arrival you may be asked to show or prove that you have:

At the website of the Bulgarian Foreign Ministry, http://www.mfa.government.bg/index_en.html, you can find information about the customs formalities upon entering the country as well as the addresses of all embassies in the country.
In the light of the events of September 2001 and the general rise of terrorism, recently the authorities starting enforcing the existing rule for registration quite vigorously.

All travelers are required by law to register with the regional passport office for foreigners or the police within 48 hours of their arrival in the country and to inform the office about any change in their address.

Those staying at a hotel, a private boarding house or an apartment rented through an accommodation company, registration is taken care of by the proprietor. If you are staying with friends or live in a private lodging, you must go to the closest police station to have yourself registered. Otherwise upon leaving the country you might have to pay a hefty fine for not doing so.

Keep in mind the process is slow as the bureaucracy in the state institutions is cumbersome and inefficient. Be prepared for spending at least several hours (if you’re lucky) being pointed from one counter to another and trying to explain yourself to surly employees who as a rule do not speak foreign languages. You’ll also have to fill in several forms in Cyrillic.

Best idea is to bring a friend (local would be best) to do the talking and filling in for you. As of the beginning of 2004 the Government decided to introduce new road taxes, collected through special stickers pasted onto the windshields of the cars and other vehicles.

There will be several types of stickers, which will allow the motorists to choose how much road tax to pay. The stickers will be valid for one week, one month or one year and will allow their owners to use the highways, and the first, second and third-class roads in the respective period. The use of city and town streets as well as roads which are a part of the municipal infrastructure will be free of charge.

From the beginning of 2004, all Transit International Routier (TIR) trucks will be obliged to have such stickers, and from July 2004 so will busses and trucks. From the beginning of 2005 all motorists will be obliged to purchase such stickers.
The stickers would be sold at the border checkpoints. Their prices for foreigners are higher than those for Bulgarians. It is expected that by 2007 the prices would become the same.

If driving over a border, be sure to go around all the trucks piled up and waiting because they go through a different line than cars do (not so with tour buses, though, so try to pass as many as you can on the road up to the border). The standard car papers, including proof of ownership as well as international insurance ("the Green Card") must be shown. For customs declarations, you will probably be asked to open the booth, and sometimes they actually search the whole car. Everyone gets to pay about five leva to be able to drive through a shallow pool of disinfectant to be sure they're not bringing any weird things on their tires into the country.

Taking a bus across the border is a long process, so be patient, have snacks available and a book or magazine. The passports of all the travelers on the bus are processed all at once (you will probably be asked to give yours to the bus driver or assistant, who will do most of the work). Chances are also good that you and the rest of the passengers will have to get your luggage and display it for the customs officers, who may or may not ask you to open it for their inspection.

If you're crossing by train, it is a long process as well, and very annoying if in the dead of night while you're trying to sleep. The conductors and customs people coming around several times to stamp, re-stamp and re-check passports, and you may have to get off the train to go to the customs desk in person, on one or both sides of the border.


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Bulgaria
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